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Dynamic Proxies in Java
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  • Title Dynamic Proxies in Java
  • Author(s) Heinz M. Kabutz
  • Publisher: InfoQ (2020)
  • Paperback N/A
  • eBook PDF (156 pages) and ePub
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: N/A
  • ISBN-13: 978-1-67804-130-4
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Book Description

Java is still quite easy to learn, especially if we focus on the most essential tools. Start with the syntax, then object-orientation, flow control, collections and Java 8 streams. Design patterns hold everything together.

To become a true Java Specialist, we need to also master the underpinnings of this great platform. How else can we develop systems that take advantage of the power of Java?

Dynamic proxies are such a tool. We can save thousands of lines of repetitive code with a single class. By taking a thorough look at how they work, we will recognize good use cases for them in our systems.

Dynamic proxies are not an everyday tool. They may come in handy only half a dozen times in our careers. But when they fit, they save us an incredible amount of effort. I once managed to replace over half a million code statements with a single dynamic proxy. Powerful stuff.

This book is for intermediate to advanced Java programmers who want to get to "guru" status. It is not suitable for beginners in Java.

About the Authors
  • Heinz M. Kabutz is the author of The Java Specialists' Newsletter, in which he explores all sorts of interesting nooks and crannies of the Java ecosystem. He is a Java Champion and a frequent speaker at all the best Java conferences, and some of the worst.
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